Organs / Maps / Visits

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Research
Gozde: Tenderloin Museum —> made contact
Ana: Emory Douglas Black Panthers/Richmond/Cartography of Bay Area Counter-cultures —> in progress
Greta: Red Poppy Art House —> pending presentation
Weilai: Sutro Baths —> pending presentation
Zoe: Chinese Cultural Center —> made contact/now changing in progress
Simon: TBA —> TBA
Tony: Popos/Urban Sanctuaries —> pending
Subhrajit: Pier 24 —> pending presentation
Emily: Facebook AIR (recommended readings by her: 1, 2, and 3) —> in progress

Final Presentation:
Ana Maria Montenegro Jaramillo+ Simon Garcia-Minaur: Open Territories
Greta L. Anderson: Red Poppy Art House
Weilai Lu: Sutro Baths
Tony Foster: Popos/Urban Sanctuaries
Subhrajit Battha: Pier 24
Emily Alexander: Facebook AIR
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Cartographies of Disaster

The Japanese earthquake changed our relationship to place, and post-disaster social media changed it again.

“Natural disasters are fundamentally experiences of place: The epicenter was here. It was this many miles from this other place. It affected here and here and here. Place is understood through position and relationship, through contact and distance.

Geography determines terrestrial points of contact. These change, but usually at a rate barely perceptible to the human eye. Politics and language anchor societal points of contact, through alliance, ideological similarity, and shared knowledge. These change more quickly than continents, but stay stable long enough to fill history textbooks. Communication technologies scaffold personal points of contact. These change quickly indeed.”

Cartographies of Disaster

Cognitive Cartography

This selection (texts, images, videos) was shared in the Relational Cartographies class and it doesn’t reflect the long list of books and studies written on the subject.

BrasiliaBrasilia’s Monumental Axis

Brasilia Walking LinesBrasilia’s Monumental Axis with walking paths illustrated

RocinhaSao Paulo, Favela de Paraisopolis, photo Tuca Vieira

Mexico BorderTijuana, Baja California and San Diego, California

AtlantaAtlanta, Giorgia

Hurricane KatrinaHurricane Katrina, 2005

Hurricane SandyHurricane Sandy, 2012

Textbooks:

Environmental Psychology by Paul A. Bell

Environmental Psychology by Robert Gifford

Books:

The Image of the city by Kevin Lynch

The Power Broker: Robert Moses and the Fall of New York by Robert A. Caro

Wrestling with Moses by Anthony Flint

Seeing like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Condition Have Failed by James C. Scott

Reality is Broken by Jane McGonigal

Robert MosesRobert Moses

Jane JacobsJane Jacobs

Links:

Did Robert Moses Ruin New York City?

[Legibility] RibbonFarm: Experiments in Refactored Perception by Venkatesh Rao

The Truth About Photographic Memory

Ten-Year Forecast by Kathi Vian

Videos:

More than Honey (00:14:20)

Automatic Google Car: Self-Driving Car on City Streets

Chimpanzee Memory Test

Stephen Wiltshire draws NYC

Building Maker Tutorial

AiAi being tested by Tetsuro Matsuzawa, a primatologist at Kyoto University. Via

30 Cities From 200 Years Ago…And Where They Are Now

The NYU Stern Urbanization Project is working on a stunning new series of animations, showcasing the expansion of 30 global cities over the last 200 years. The animations, created using information from The Atlas of Urban Expansion, clearly show the extremely rapid expansion in global cities in the 19th and 20th centuries. Particularly striking is the growth in the latter half of the 20th century, in which many cities increased their built-up area by more than 10 times.

This is in keeping with the theory of falling density, which holds that as cities have grown bigger and the world has urbanized, densities have been steadily falling. As a result, cities require more urban land per person, meaning total growth in the city area is much greater than population growth.” Text via NYUStern

Courtesy of Janet Delaney

The Ellis Act by the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project

The Ellis Act is a state law which says that landlords have the right to evict tenants in order to “go out of business”. All units in the building must be cleared of all tenants- no one can be singled out. Most often it is used to convert to condos or group-owned tenancy-in-common flats. Once a building becomes a condo it is exempt from Rent Control, regardless of the age of the building, and even if a unit owner subsequently rents to a long-term tenant.

See this project by the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project HERE